What’s happening with changes to anti-spam laws?

In October last year the Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) announced a consultation to lower, or even remove, the threshold for the serving financial penalties on those who unlawfully send electronic direct marketing. I wrote at the time that

There appears to be little resistance (as yet, at least) to the idea of lowering or removing the penalty threshold. Given that, and given the ICO’s apparent willingness to take on the spammers, we may well see a real and significant attack on the scourge

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and DCMS both seemed at the time to be keen to effect the necessary legislative changes to amend the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR) so that, per the mechanism at section 55A of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA), adopted by PECR by virtue of regulation 31, either a serious contravention alone of PECR, or a serious contravention likely to cause annoyance, inconvenience or anxiety, could give rise to a monetary penalty without the need to show – as now – likely substantial damage or substantial distress.

However, today, the Information Commissioner himself, Christopher Graham, gave vent to frustrations about delay in bringing about these changes:

Time and time again the Government talks about changing the law and clamping down on this problem, but so far it’s just that – talk. Today they are holding yet another roundtable to discuss the issue, and we seem to be going round in circles. The Government need to lay the order, change the law and bring in a reform that would make a real difference

So what has happened? Have representatives of direct marketing companies lobbied against the proposals? It would be interesting to know who was at today’s “roundtable” and what was said. But there was certainly an interesting tweet from journalist Roddy Mansfield. One hopes a report will emerge, and some record of the meeting.

One wonders why – if they are – marketing industry bodies might object to the proposed changes. The financial penalty provisions would only come into play if marketers failed to comply with the law. Spammers would get punished – the responsible companies would not.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

1 Comment

Filed under Data Protection, Information Commissioner, marketing, monetary penalty notice, PECR, spam texts

One response to “What’s happening with changes to anti-spam laws?

  1. To make a slightly off-topic observation: nobody can doubt the sincerity of Roddy Mansfield’s freelance PECR enforcement (and it’s admirable for pure mischief). However, Mr Mansfield’s tweet also refers to Richard Herman. While it is absolutely correct to doubt the goodwill of elements of the direct marketing industry, the fact that Mr Herman owns a call-recording software company perhaps undermines his status as a consumer champion.

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