Attend ICO DP conference, get unsolicited marketing from a hotel…

I greatly enjoyed yesterday’s (2 March 2015) Data Protection Practitioner Conference run by the Information Commissioner’s Office. I was representing NADPO on our stand, and the amount of interest was both gratifying and illustrative of the importance of having a truly representative body for professionals working in the field of information rights. NADPO were at pains – in running our prize draw (winners picked at random on stage by Information Commissioner Christopher Graham) – to make sure we let participants know what would or would not happen with their details. Feedback from delegates about this was also positive, and I’m pleased at least one privacy professional picked up on it.  Therefore the irony of the following events is not lost on me.

I’d stayed overnight on Sunday, in a Macdonald hotel I booked through the agency Expedia. Naturally, I’m not one to encourage the sending to me of direct electronic marketing, and as the unsolicited sending of such marketing is contrary to regulation 22 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 I didn’t expect to receive any, either from the agent or the hotel. Yet yesterday I did receive some, from the hotel group. So I’ve sent them this complaint:

I booked the hotel through your agent, Expedia.co.uk. As a professional working in the field of privacy and data protection I always make sure I opt out of any electronic marketing. Hence, when making my booking, I checked the Expedia box which said

“Check the box if you do not want to receive emails from Expedia with travel deals, special offers, and other information”.

However, I also consulted their privacy policy, which says:

“Expedia.co.uk may share your information with [suppliers] such as hotel, airline, car rental, and activity providers, who fulfill your travel reservations. Throughout Expedia.co.uk, all services provided by a third-party supplier are described as such. We encourage you to review the privacy policies of any third-party travel supplier whose products you purchase through Expedia.co.uk. Please note that these suppliers also may contact you as necessary to obtain additional information about you, facilitate your travel reservation, or respond to a review you may submit.”

I then consulted Macdonald Hotels’ privacy policy, but this seems to relate only to your website, and is silent on the use of clients’ data passed on by an agent.

Accordingly, I cannot be said to have consented to the sending by you to me of electronic marketing. Yet yesterday at 13.07 I received an email saying “Thank you for registering with Macdonald Hotels and Resorts…As a member of our mailing list you will shortly start to receive [further unsolicited electronic marketing].”

Ironically enough, I was in Manchester to attend the annual Data Protection Practitioners’ Conference run by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). As you will be aware, the ICO regulates compliance with the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR). Before I raise a complaint with the ICO I would appreciate a) your removing me from any marketing database b) not receiving any further unsolicited marketing, and c) receiving your comments regarding your apparent breach of your legal obligations.

Each instance of unsolicited marketing is at best one of life’s minor irritants, but I have concerns that, because of this, some companies treat compliance with legal obligations as, at best, a game in which they try to trick customers into agreeing to receiving marketing, and at worst, as unnecessary. It may be that I received this particular unsolicited marketing from Macdonald Hotels by mistake (although that in itself might raise data protection concerns about the handling of and accuracy of customer data) but it happens too often. The media have rightly picked up on the forthcoming changes to PECR which will make it easier for the ICO to take enforcement actions regarding serious contraventions, but, sadly, I don’t see the lower level, less serious contraventions, decreasing.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under consent, Data Protection, Information Commissioner, marketing, PECR

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