Shameless

Only very recently I wrote about how the Liberal Democrats had been found by the Information Commissioner’s Officer (ICO) to have been in breach of their obligations under anti-spam laws (or, correctly, the ICO had determined it was “unlikely” the Lib Dems had complied with the law). This was because they had sent me unsolicited emails promoting their party without my consent, in contravention of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR). The ICO told me that “we have written to the organisation to remind them of their obligations under the PECR and ensure that valid consent is obtained from individuals”.

Well, the reminder hasn’t worked: today I went on the Lib Dem site and noticed the invitation to agree that “The NHS needs an extra £8bn”. Who could disagree? There was a box to enter my email address and “back our campaign”. Which campaign did they mean? Who knows? I assumed the campaign to promote NHS funding, but there was no privacy notice at all (at least on the mobile site). I entered an email address, because I certainly agree with a campaign that the NHS needs an extra £8bn pounds, but what I certainly didn’t do was consent to receive email marketing.

Untitled

But of course I did…within eight hours I received an email from someone called Olly Grender asking me to donate to the Lib Dems. Why on earth would I want to do that? And a few hours later I got an email from Nick Clegg himself, reiterating Olly’s message. Both emails were manifestly, shamelessly, sent in contravention of PECR, only a couple of weeks after the ICO assured me they were going to “remind” the Lib Dems of the law.

Surely the lesson is the same one the cynics have told us over the years – don’t believe what politicians tell you.

And of course, only this week there was a further example, with the notorious Telegraph “business leaders” letter. The open letter published by the paper, purporting to come from 5000 small business owners, had in fact been written by Conservative Campaign Headquarters, and signatories  were merely people who had filled in a form on the Conservative party website agreeing to sign the letter but who were informed in a privacy notice that “We will not share your details with anyone outside the Conservative Party”. But share they did, and so it was that multiple duplicate signatories, and signatories who were by no means small business owners, found their way into the public domain. Whether any of them will complain to the ICO will probably determine the extent to which this might have been a contravention, not of PECR (this wasn’t unsolicited marketing), but of the Data Protection Act 1998, and the Conservatives’ obligation to process personal data fairly and lawfully. But whatever the outcome, it’s another example of the abuse of web forms, and the harvesting of email addresses, for the promotion of party political aims.

I will be referring the Lib Dems matter back to the ICO, and inviting them again (they declined last time) to take enforcement action for repeat and apparently deliberate, or reckless, contraventions of their legal obligations under PECR.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

1 Comment

Filed under consent, Data Protection, Information Commissioner, marketing, PECR, privacy notice, spam

One response to “Shameless

  1. Pingback: Liberal Spamocrats – 2040 information law blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s