The care.data leaflet campaign – legally necessary?

Readers of this blog [sometimes I imagine them1] may well be fed up with posts about care.data (see here, here and here). But this is my blog and I’ll cry if I want to. So…

Doyen of information rights bloggers, Tim Turner, has written in customary analytic detail on how the current NHS care.data leafleting campaign was not necessitated by data protection law, and on how, despite some indications to the contrary, GPs will not be in the Information Commissioner’s firing line if they fail adequately to inform patients about what will be happening to their medical data.

He’s right, of course: where a data controller is subject to a legal obligation to disclose personal data (other than under a contract) then it is not obliged, pace the otherwise very informative blogpost by the Information Commissioner’s Dawn Monaghan, to give data subjects a privacy, or fair processing notice.

(In passing, and in an attempt to outnerd the unoutnerdable, I would point out that Tim omits that, by virtue of The Data Protection (Conditions under Paragraph 3 of Part II of Schedule 1) Order 2000, if a data subject properly requests a privacy notice in circumstances where a data controller is subject to a legal obligation to disclose personal data (other than under a contract) and would, thus, otherwise not be required to issue one, the data controller must comply2.)

Tim says, though

The leaflet drop is no way to inform people about such a significant step, but I don’t think it is required

That appears to be true, under data protection law, but, under broader obligations imposed on the relevant authorities under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), as incorporated in domestic law in the Human Rights Act 1998, it might not be so (and here, unlike with data protection law, we don’t have to consider the rigid controller/processor dichotomy in order to decide who the relevant, and liable, public authority is, and I would suggest that NHS England (as the “owner of the care.data programme” in Dawn Monaghan’s words) seems the obvious candidate, but GPs might also be caught).

In 1997 the European Court of Human Rights addressed the very-long-standing concept of the confidentiality of doctor-patient relations, in the context of personal medical data, in Z v Finland (1997) 25 EHRR 371, and said

the Court will take into account that the protection of personal data, not least medical data, is of fundamental importance to a person’s enjoyment of his or her right to respect for private and family life as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention (art. 8). Respecting the confidentiality of health data is a vital principle in the legal systems of all the Contracting Parties to the Convention. It is crucial not only to respect the sense of privacy of a patient but also to preserve his or her confidence in the medical profession and in the health services in general…Without such protection, those in need of medical assistance may be deterred from revealing such information of a personal and intimate nature as may be necessary in order to receive appropriate treatment and, even, from seeking such assistance, thereby endangering their own health and, in the case of transmissible diseases, that of the community

This, I think, nicely encapsulates why so many good and deep-thinking people have fundamental concerns about care.data.

Now, I am not a lawyer, let alone a human rights lawyer, but it does occur to me that a failure to inform patients about what would be happening with their confidential medical records when GP’s were required to upload them, and a failure to allow them to opt-out, would have potentially infringed patients’ Article 8 rights. We should not forget that, initially, there was no intention to inform patients at all (there had no attempt to inform patients about the similar upload of hospital medical data, which has been going on for over twenty years). It is, surely, possible therefore, that NHS England is not just “helping” GPs to inform patients without having any responsibility to do so (as Dawn Monaghan suggests), but that it recognises its potential vulnerability to an Article 8 challenge, and is trying to avoid or mitigate this. Whether the leaflets themselves, and the campaign to deliver them, are adequate to achieve this aim is another matter. As has been noted, the leaflet contains no opt out form, and there seem to be numerous examples of people (often vulnerable people, for instance in care homes, or refuges) who will have little or no chance of receiving a copy.

At the launch of the tireless MedConfidential campaign last year, Shami Chakrabarti, of Liberty, spoke passionately about the potential human rights vulnerabilities of the care.data programme. Notifying patients of what is proposed might not have been necessary under data protection law, but it is quite possible that the ECHR aspect of doing so was one of the things on which the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) has been legally advised. Someone made an FOI request for this advice last year, and it is notable that HSCIC seem never to have completed their response to the request.

1I make no apologies for linking to one of Larkin’s most beautiful, but typically bleak and dystopian, pieces of prose, but I would add that it finishes “…These have I tried to remind of the excitement of jazz, and tell where it may still be found.”

2Unless the data controller does not have sufficient information about the individual in order readily to determine whether he is processing personal data about that individual, in which case the data controller shall send to the individual a written notice stating that he cannot provide the requisite information because of his inability to make that determination, and explaining the reasons for that inability

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2 Comments

Filed under care.data, Confidentiality, Data Protection, data sharing, Europe, human rights, Information Commissioner, NHS, Privacy

2 responses to “The care.data leaflet campaign – legally necessary?

  1. David

    My understanding is that it was not DPA that made the leaflet drop necessary, but the common law duty which could not be set aside, i.e. by s251, because reasonable effort had not been made to communicate this unexpected use.

    SUS had s251 cover and when I challenged this, the director of IG at the IC said that providers included this use in their FPNs (always gets a laugh as none of them do).

    also, the GPs that have taken the Hippocratic oath would be breaking it with this.

  2. CP

    If there are Human Rights concerns, then the ICO could enforce unlawful processing re A.8 (as he did with Royston (ANPR on all roads into Royston) and Southampton City Council (audio recording CCTV in cabs). After all Sensitive Personal Data are involved here. Dawn Monaghan’s blog overlooks unlawful processing; ICO could easily reassure the public via A.8 link to the DPA that he is not out of the game to the extent that DM’s blog implies.

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