Blackpool Displeasure Breach, redux

Over a year ago I blogged about a tweet by a member of the Oyston family connected with Blackpool FC:

a fan replies to a news item about the club’s manager, and calls the Oyston family “wankers”. Sam Oyston responds by identifying the seat the fan – presumably a season-ticket holder – occupies, and implies that if he continues to be rude the ticket will be withdrawn

For the reasons in that post I thought this raised interesting, and potentially concerning, data protection issues, and I mentioned that the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) had powers to take action. It was one of (perhaps the) most read posts (showing, weirdly, that football is possibly more of interest to most people than data protection itself) and it seemed that some people did intend complaining to the ICO. So, recently, I made an FOI request to the ICO for any information held by them concerning Blackpool FC’s data protection compliance. This was the reply

We have carried out thorough searches of the information we hold and have identified one instance where a member of the public raised concerns with the ICO in September 2014, about the alleged processing of personal data by Blackpool FC.

We concluded that there was insufficient evidence to consider the possibility of a s55 offence under the Data Protection Act 1998 (the DPA), and were unable to make an assessment as the individual had not yet raised their concerns with Blackpool FC direct.  We therefore advised the individual to contact the Club and to come back to us if they were still concerned, however we did not hear from them again.  As such, no investigation took place, nor was any assessment made of the issues raised.

This suggests the ICO appears wrongly to consider itself unable to undertake section 42 assessments under the Data Protection Act 1998 unless the data subject has complained to the data controller – a stance strongly criticised by Dr David Erdos on this blog, and one which has the potential to put the data subject further in dispute with the data controller (as I can imagine could have happened here, with a family some of whose members are ready to sue to protect their reputation). It also suggests though that maybe people weren’t quite as interested as the page views suggested. Nonetheless, I am posting this brief update, because a few people asked about it.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under Data Protection, Information Commissioner

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