Category Archives: access to information

ICO fails at FOI

I won’t rehearse the points I made in previous posts. Enough to say this – the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), in addition to being tasked with regulating Freedom of Information (FOI) law, must also comply with it, and anecdotal evidence suggested a long-standing failure to do so adequately (prior to, as well as during the COVID pandemic). That being the case – to whom should other public authorities look for exemplary guidance? Or put even more shortly – why should public authorities bother with compliance?

I now have some statistics.

I asked the ICO, under FOI, how many FOI cases it had failed to respond to within three months of their receipt (bear in mind that one month is the statutory limit). They have now told me that in 92 cases in the past year they have failed to respond to an FOI request within three months. Some cases are still open – in one, they have failed to reply to a request for 951 days and counting (I don’t know, and am almost beyond caring, whether these are calendar days or working days – it barely matters any more), and five cases are over a year old and still unanswered.

As I said previously, the ICO says that FOI enforcement may be appropriate where there are “repeated or significant failures to meet the time for compliance” and that, when deciding to take enforcement action, the ICO will take into account such factors as “the severity and/or repetition of the breach; whether there is evidence that obligations are being…persistently ignored; whether there would be an educative or deterrent affect; whether it would help clarify or test an issue; and whether an example needs to be created or a precedent set”.

A clearer case for (self-)enforcement action could scarcely be imagined.

Outgoing Commissioner Elizabeth Denham is handing her successor John Edwards a severe problem, both in terms of compliance but also – crucially – in terms of reputation of the office.

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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“Access delayed is access denied” – ICO’s terrible FOI compliance

Statistics show that the ICO is regularly delayed – sometimes very severely so – when responding to FOIA requests made to it. Is there a need for a review of the ICO’s own compliance?

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is tasked with regulating and enforcing the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA). The ICO is also – perhaps unusually for a regulator – subject to the law it regulates (it is a public authority, listed in Schedule One to FOIA). This means that – sometimes – the ICO must investigate its own compliance with FOIA. It also means that its own compliance with FOIA, and the seriousness with which it treats its own compliance, is bound to be viewed by other public authorities as an example.

FOIA is, let us not forget, of profound democratic importance. The right to receive information is one of the components of Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham has previously said

openness of information, through FOI laws and other instruments, is vitally-important not only for government accountability in the moment, but also for the long-term health of our democracy… since information is power, the right to information goes to the heart of a democracy’s healthy functioning.

FOIA lays down timescales for complying with a request for information. The core one says that information must in general be provided within twenty working days. In that same speech Ms Denham referred to timeliness (“It is rightly said that access delayed is access denied”) and the benefits of publicising delays by authorities:

Reporting publicly on timeliness has proved to be a powerful tool for improving timely disclosure of information. And public authorities have used their poor grades to push successfully for more resources where the demand has outstripped supply.

Indeed, she has previously taken government departments to task for their FOIA delays

I think that central government though has got away with – I’m not going to say murder – I think they’ve got away with behaviour that needs to be adjusted…I know which organisations we need to focus on…

The ICO certainly has enforcement powers, and a policy which informs it when action is appropriate. The Freedom of information regulatory action policy (which doesn’t appear to have been updated since 2012) says that enforcement may be appropriate where there are “repeated or significant failures to meet the time for compliance” and that, when deciding to take enforcement action, the ICO will take into account such factors as

the severity and / or repetition of the breach; whether there is evidence that obligations are being deliberately or persistently ignored; whether there would be an educative or deterrent affect; whether it would help clarify or test an issue; and whether an example needs to be created or a precedent set.

With all of this in mind, one organisation the ICO apparently needs to focus on is itself.

Regrettably, and rather oddly, the ICO doesn’t publish figures on its own FOI compliance, except at a very high level, and combined with other types of access requests, in its annual report). This is despite the fact that the Code of Practice issued under section 45 of FOIA, observance of which the ICO is specifically tasked with promoting, says that public authorities with more than 100 members of staff should published detailed statistics on compliance.

However, what evidence there is indicates a repeated, and serious, failure by the ICO to comply with the timescales it is supposed to enforce on others. Of the formal decision notices issued by the ICO against itself, in 2020 and 2021, 50% (10 out of 20) found a failure to comply with the statutory timescale (and two further ones appear – from an analysis of the notices – to have involved delay, without resulting in a specific finding of such). And it is worth noting that these are formal decisions where requesters have asked for formal notices to be issued – it is almost inevitable that there will be similar delays in a significant proportion of those requests which don’t make it to a formal decision.

Indeed, analysis of recent requests to the ICO made on the request website WhatDoTheyKnowsimilarly shows delays in approximately half the requests. But even worse, many of those delays are of an extraordinary length. In two cases, requests made in February 2021 have only been responded to in November – delays of ninemonths, and in other cases there are delays of six, four and two months.

COVID has – no doubt – affected the ICO, as it has affected all organisations. But if the ICO needs extra resource to comply with FOIA, it has certainly not indicated that. Its published approach to regulatory compliance during the pandemic (not updated since June this year) says that where public authorities have backlogs, the ICO expects them to “establish recovery plans focused on bringing the organisation back within compliance with the Freedom of Information Act within a reasonable timeframe”. In the accompanying blogpost the Deputy Commissioner said that

we have seen more and more organisations adjusting to the circumstances, and returning to offering the transparency…our [own] recovery plan has had a positive impact in removing and reducing backlogs

If that is the case it is hard to know why the WhatDoTheyKnow examples (and one’s own experiences) show precisely the opposite picture.

What is also of concern – though this is an issue for policy-makers and Parliament – is that there is nothing that an individual can do when faced with delays like this, except complain – once more to the ICO. FOIA expressly does not permit individuals to take civil action against public authorities for failure to comply – the only recourse is through the ICO as regulator. Short of bringing judicial review proceedings, citizens must just suck it up.

In 2016 the Independent Commission on Freedom of Information said that FOIA was “generally working well”, but that it “would like to see a significant reduction in the delays in the process”. In 2016, that was not addressed at the ICO, but now it most certainly could be. That Independent Commission has long been dissolved. Meanwhile, the Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee is conducting an inquiry into the Cabinet Office’s FOI handling. 

But, maybe, there actually needs to be some Parliamentary oversight of the ICO’s own FOI compliance.

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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What John Edwards will inherit

The new Information Commissioner will have a lot on his plate. I’m going to focus very briefly on what is, objectively, a very small matter but which, to me, illustrates much about priorities within the ICO.

On 29 July I happened to notice an Information Tribunal decision which I thought was slightly odd, in that apparently both the Tribunal, and the Commissioner beforehand, had dealt with it under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 rather than the Environmental Information Regulations 2004, despite the subject matter (a tree inspection report) appearing to fall squarely under the latter’s ambit.

However, the decision notice appealed (referred to as FS5081345 in the Tribunal judgment), does not appear on the ICO’s searchable online database (in fact, no decisions relating to the public authority – the mighty Great Wyrley Parish Council – are listed). It’s unusual but certainly not unheard of for decision notices not to get uploaded (either by overlook, or – occasionally – for other, legal reasons) but in the past when I’ve asked for one of these, informally, it’s been provided by return.

So I used the ICO’s online Chat function to ask for a copy of the decision notice. However, I was told I had to submit a request in writing (of course I’d already done so – the Chat function is in writing, after all, but let’s not quibble). I said I was concerned that what was a simple request would get sucked up into the ICO’s own FOI processes, but the person on the Chat thought I would get a response within a couple of days.

Those who’ve stayed this far into the blogpost will be unsurprised to hear what happened next – my simple request got sucked into the ICO’s own FOI processes, and more than seven weeks on (more than three weeks beyond the statutory timescale for responding) I have still had no response, and no indication of why not, other than the pressure the FOI team is under.

And that last point is key: if the ICO’s own FOI caseworkers are under such pressure that they cannot deal with a very simple request within the legal timescale, nor update me in any meaningful way as to why, something has surely gone wrong.

At a recent NADPO webinar Dr Neil Bhatia spoke about his own difficulties with getting information out of the ICO through FOI. He (and I) were challenged by one of the other speakers on why we didn’t more regularly take formal action to force the issue. It was a fair point, and prompted me yesterday to ask the ICO for a formal decision under section 50 of the FOI Act (which means the ICO will have to issue an FOI decision notice on whether the ICO handled an FOI request for an FOI request in accordance with the law – and that sentence itself illustrates the ridiculousness of the situation).

This isn’t the only FOI request I have that the ICO is late responding to. I have one going back to May this year and another to June (albeit on rather more complex subjects). And I know that I and Dr Bhatia are not alone.

All the fine talk from the current Commissioner about forging international data protection accords, and encouraging “data driven innovation” can’t prevent a perception that her office seems increasingly to have left FOI regulation (and in some cases its own FOI compliance) behind. The right to access information is (part of) a fundamental right (just as is the right to data protection). If the ICO doesn’t want the role, is it time for a separate FOI Commissioner?

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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ICO ignores its own FOI investigators

In the past I recall a few cases where the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) had to adjudicate on its own compliance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA). As a public authority, the ICO must comply with FOIA in the same way that all other public authorities must (fundamentally, by responding to a request within twenty working days). In a few cases, the ICO’s investigation of itself would even be slightly critical (along the lines of “you could have handled this a bit better”). But I have never, until now, seen a case like this one.

Extraordinarily, here we have a decision in which we see the ICO (as “the Commissioner”) berating itself (as “the ICO”) for…failing to reply to its own investigators. The notice gives the details:

On 18 May 2021, the complainant wrote to the ICO…and requested information…

The ICO acknowledged the request for information on 19 May 2021…

To date, a substantive response has not been issued…

The complainant contacted the Commissioner on 19 June 2021 to complain about the failure by the ICO to respond to his request…

On 5 July 2021, the Commissioner wrote to the ICO, reminding it of its responsibilities and asking it to provide a substantive response to the complainant within 10 working days…

Despite this intervention the ICO has failed to respond to the complainant.

As the notice says (indeed, as all such notices say), failure to comply may now result in the ICO making written certification of this fact to the High Court pursuant to section 54 of the Act and may be dealt with as a contempt of court. How on earth would this work though? As a matter of law, could a regulator certify its own non-compliance to the High Court in this way?

What a bizarre situation.

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Journalist has to seek pro bono support to enforce subject access request

My firm Mishcon de Reya is acting for John Pring, stalwart editor of Disability News Service, who has been seeking access to his personal data from DWP for more than a year. The ICO upheld his complaint but (see this blog, passim) said it wouldn’t take steps to require DWP to comply.

More here, and here.

As a result of the latest letter, and media coverage, ICO has said it is reopening the case.

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Filed under access to information, DWP, GDPR, human rights, Information Commissioner, subject access, UK GDPR

Oil well not personal data shock

In news that should surprise no one, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has ruled that the locations of two oprhaned oil or gas well bores do not amount to personal data, for the purposes of the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 (EIR).

Perhaps more interestingly, the ICO cites the much-derided-but-probably-still-good-law case of Durant:

The Commissioner accepts that placing the two addresses into the public domain would allow the [owners of the land] to be identified. However, she does not consider that the information that would be revealed via disclosure “relates to” those individuals and it is therefore not their personal data…

And specifically refers to the famous dicta of Mr Justice Auld (as he was) from the Durant case

Mere mention of the data subject in a document held by a data controller does not necessarily amount to his personal data. Whether it does so in any particular instance depends on where it falls in a continuum of relevance or proximity to the data subject as distinct, say, from transactions or matters in which he may have been involved to a greater or lesser degree. It seems to me that there are two notions that may be of assistance. The first is whether the information is biographical in a significant sense, that is, going beyond the recording of the putative data subject’s involvement in a matter or an event that has no personal connotations, a life event in respect of which his privacy could not be said to be compromised. The second is one of focus. The information should have the putative data subject as its focus rather than some other person with whom he may have been involved or some transaction or event in which he may have figured or have had an interest, for example, as in this case, an investigation into some other person’s or body’s conduct that he may have instigated. In short, it is information that affects his privacy, whether in his personal or family life, business or professional capacity

So, at least for now, oil wells will stay out of the list of Things Which Have Been Found to be Personal Data.

And as my esteemed colleague Adam Rose notes, oil’s well that ends well. Pun complaints should be addressed here.

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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High Court – subject access, breach of confidence and the offence of reidentification (part 2)

In June last year I wrote about an unsuccessful strike-out application by the defendant in the High Court in proceedings arising from a very unfortunate incident, whereby Lambeth Council had imperfectly redacted highly sensitive data when responding to a subject access request.

The requester was the father (“AM”) of a child about whom a referral had been made to Lambeth social services, and the person whose identity was inadvertently revealed (when AM disapplied redactions made using Adobe software) was the person who made the referral – “HJ” – who happened to be AM’s sister.

The substantive proceedings have now come to trial, with a judgment now published (London Borough of Lambeth v AM (Judgment No. 2) [2021] EWHC 186 (QB)). Unsurprisingly, the judge held that AM acted in breach of confidence by removing the redactions, by retaining a copy of the information and refusing to return or destroy it, and by using the information to write a letter before action accusing HJ of malicious defamation, breach of confidence and harassment.

There were no further allusions to an apparent criminal prosecution of AM by the Information Commissioner’s Office. One waits to see if further news about that emerges.

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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ICO SAR guidance – open to challenge?

A new piece by me and a colleague on the Mishcon de Reya website, about the ICO’s new SAR guidance https://www.mishcon.com/news/ico-guidance-on-subject-access-requests

A couple of NB points where this guidance differs from the draft version:

ICO suggests one of the factors to take into account when deciding whether a request is excessive is “Whether refusing to provide the information or even acknowledging it is held may cause substantive damage to the individual”. To me, this is pretty extraordinary, and might have the effect of putting the requester to proof as to damage caused by non-compliance.

ICO also has shifted its position, and suggest that staff time perse (rather than disbursements) might be charged for in the event of excessive or manifestly unfounded requests. 

I have my own views on whether these propositions are positive or negative. I suspect though that we will see challenges.

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If ICO won’t regulate the law, it must reboot itself

The exercise of the right of (subject) access under Article 15 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the exercise of a fundamental right to be aware of and verify the lawfulness of the processing of personal data about oneself.

That this is a fundamental right is emphasised by the range of enforcement powers available to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), against those controllers who fail to comply with their obligations in response to an access request. These include the power to serve administrative fines to a maximum amount of €20m, but, more prosaically, the power to order the controller to comply with the data subject’s requests to exercise his or her rights. This, surely, is a basic function of the ICO – the sort of regulatory action which underlines its existence. This, much more than operating regulatory sandboxes, or publishing normative policy papers, is surely what the ICO is fundamentally there to do.

Yet read this, a letter shown to me recently which was sent by ICO to someone complaining about the handling of an access request:

 

Dear [data subject],

Further to my recent correspondence, I write regarding the way in which [a London Borough] (The Council) has handled your subject access request.

I have contacted the Council and from the evidence they have provided to me, as stated before, it appears that they have infringed your right to access under the GDPR by failing to comply with your SAR request. However, it does not appear as though they are willing to provide you with any further information and we have informed them of our dissatisfaction with this situation.

It is a requirement under the Data protection Act 2018 that we investigate cases to the ‘extent appropriate’ and after lengthy correspondence with the Council, it appears they are no longer willing co-operate with us to provide this information. Therefore, you may have better results if you seek independent legal advice regarding the matters raised in this particular case.

Here we have the ICO telling a data subject that it will not take action against a public authority data controller which has infringed her rights by failing to comply with an access request. Instead, the requester must seek her own legal advice (almost inevitably at her own significant cost).

Other controllers might look at this and wonder whether they should bother complying with the law, if no sanction arises for failing to do so. And other data subjects might look at it and wonder what is the point in exercising their rights, if the regulator will not enforce them.

This is the most stark single example in a collection of increasing evidence that the ICO is failing to perform its basic tasks of regulation and enforcement.

It is just one data subject, exercising her right. But it is a right which underpins data protection law: if you don’t know and can’t find out what information an organisation has about you, then your ability to exercise other rights is stopped short.

The ICO should reboot itself. It should, before and above all else, perform its first statutory duty – to monitor and enforce the application of the GDPR.

I don’t understand why it does not want to do so.

[P.S. I think the situation described here is different, although of the same species, to situations where ICO finds likely non-compliance but declines to take punitive action – such as a monetary penalty. Here, there is a simple corrective regulatory power available – an enforcement notice (essentially a “steps order”) under section 148 Data Protection Act 2018.]

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Heathrow is public authority under EIRs, says ICO

A post by me on the Mishcon de Reya website, on a recent ICO decision holding that Heathrow Airports Ltd is subject to the Environmental Information Regulations 2004.

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