Category Archives: adequacy

Schrems II – what now?

A piece I have written with my Mishcon colleague Adam Rose, looking at the issues for businesses involved in international transfers (esp. to the US).

Make no mistake – the effect of Schrems II is to make bulk/regular transfers of personal data to the US problematic (putting it at its lowest). It arguably has the same effect in respect of transfers to most, if not all, third countries.

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Filed under adequacy, Data Protection, data security, Europe, facebook, GDPR, Information Commissioner, national security, privacy shield

Schrems II – this time it’s serious

As soon as judgment came out, my Mishcon de Reya colleague Adam Rose and I recorded our initial reactions to the CJEU’s decision in Schrems II. Here’s the link to the recording. Excuse my lockdown locks.

Some takeaways

  • The EU-US Privacy Shield arrangement for transferring personal data to the US is declared invalid.
  • Parties using Standard Contractual Clauses to transfer personal data from the EEA to countries outside must not do so if, in their assessment, the recipient country doesn’t provide an adequate level of protection. There must now be serious questions as to whether any transfers to the US can be valid.
  • The Binding Corporate Rules regime used by some of the world’s biggest international groups must now also be open to challenge.
  • Data Protection Authorities (such as the ICO) must intervene to stop transfers under SCCs which are made to countries without an adequate level of protection.
  • Post-Brexit UK may be seen as an attractive place for US companies to base operations, but there may well be further legal challenges to such arrangements.

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There’s nothing like consistency

A tale of two Member States, and two supervisory authorities.

First, the Belgium Data Protection Authority is reported to have fined a controller €50,000 for, among other infringements, appointing its director of audit, risk and compliance as its Data Protection Officer (DPO). This was – the DPA appears to have said – a conflict of  interest, and therefore an infringement of Article 38(6) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Second (and bearing in mind that all cases turn on their specific facts), one notes that, in the UK, the Data Protection Officer for the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), is its Head of Risk and Governance.

Let’s speculate –

Are the tasks of a Head of Risk and Governance likely to be similar to those of a director of audit, risk and compliance?

Would the Belgium DPA take the view that its UK equivalent is infringing GDPR, by appointing as DPO someone in circumstances which create a conflict of interest? (ICO notably says “[In respect of the combined roles of] DPO and Head of Risk and Governance, the tasks and focus of each role complement each other, and do not conflict. Neither responsibility is focused on determining the purposes and means of processing personal data but are both focused on providing advice about the risks, mitigations, safeguards and solutions required to ensure our processing is compliant and supported by our business decisions“).

What view would the European Data Protection Board take, if asked to consider the matter under the GDPR consistency mechanism (for instance on receipt of a request for an Opinion, under Article 64(2))?

Does it matter, given Brexit?

And if doesn’t matter immediately, might the status and position of the ICO’s DPO be one of the factors the European Commission might subsequently take into account, when deciding whether post-Brexit UK has an adequate level of protection, as a third country?

No answers folks, just questions.

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under adequacy, Brexit, consistency, Data Protection, Europe, GDPR, Information Commissioner