Category Archives: enforcement

The Cost of Enforcement

I wrote recently, on the Mishcon de Reya Data Matters blog, about whether BA and Marriott might actually avoid the fines the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) intends to serve on them. In that piece, I said

one has no doubt whatsoever that BA and Marriott will have had lawyers working extensively and aggressively on challenging the notices of intent.

With that in mind, it is interesting to note that, in commentary on recent management accounts, the ICO warns that

Legal expenses…are tracking at much higher levels than budgeted and are expected to be adverse to budget for the full financial year

Indeed, the ICO’s legal spend for this year is forecast to be £2.65m, against a budget of £1.98m. These sound like large sums (and of course they are), but, compared with the likely legal budgets of BA, or Marriott, or indeed, many other of the huge companies whose processing is potentially subject to enforcement action by ICO, they are tiny. Any large controller faced with a huge fine will almost inevitably spend large sums in challenging the action.

Query whether ICO can, realistically, actually afford to levy fines at the level GDPR envisages?

The views in this post (and indeed most posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Storm clouds

Another post by me on the Mishcon de Reya website: my crystal ball may be way off, but I wonder if genuine enforcement action might be on its way for AdTech and its biggest players.

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The most boring blogpost on this blog?

Although GDPR, and the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA18), took effect from 25 May 2018, it has been notable that the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has continued to exercise its enforcement powers under the prior law. There is no problem with this, and it is only to be expected, given that regulatory investigations can take some time. The DPA18 contains transitional provisions which mean that certain sections of the Data Protection Act 1998 continue to have effect, despite its general repeal. This is the reason, for instance, why the ICO could serve its recent enforcement notice on Hudson Bay Finance Ltd using the powers in section 40 of the 1998 – paragraph 33 of Schedule 20 to the DPA18 provides that section 40 of the 1998 Act continues to apply if the ICO is satisfied that the controller contravened the old data protection principles before the rest of the 1998 Act was repealed.

However, what is noticeable in the Hudson Bay Finance Ltd enforcement notice is that it says that it was prompted by a request for assessment by the complainant, apparently made on 21 September 2018, purportedly made under section 42 of the 1998 Act. I say “purportedly” because the transitional provisions in Schedule 20 of DPA18 require the ICO to consider a request for assessment made before 25 May 2018, but in all other respects, section 42 is repealed. Accordingly, as a matter of law, a data subject can (after 25 May 2018) no longer exercise their right to request an assessment under section 42 of the 1998 Act.

This is all rather academic, because it appears to me that the ICO has discretion – even if it does not have an obligation – to consider a complaint by a data subject relating to compliance with the 1998 Act. And ICO clearly (as described above) has the power still to take enforcement action for contraventions of the 1998 Act. But no one ever told me I can’t use my blog to make arid academic points.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Information Tribunal rejects data subject appeals under new Data Protection Act

The Information Tribunal has recently heard the first applications under the Data Protection Act 2018 for orders regarding the Information Commissioner’s handling of data protection complaints. As I write on the Mishcon de Reya website, the Tribunal has peremptorily dismissed them.

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On the breach

Failure to notify the ICO in a timely manner of a personal data breach under PECR carries a £1000 fixed penalty notice – why not something similar under wider data protection law?

When the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (“PECR”) were amended in 2011 to implement the Citizens’ Rights Directive, an obligation was placed upon providers of a public electronic communications service  (“service providers”) to notify personal data breaches to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) “without undue delay”, and in 2013 article 2(2) of European Commission Regulation 611/2013 provided , in terms, that “without undue delay” would mean “no later than 24 hours after the detection of the personal data breach, where feasible”. The 2011 amendment regulations also gave the ICO the power to serve a fixed penalty notice of £1000 on a service provider which failed to comply with notification obligations.

Thus it was that in 2016 both EE and Talk Talk were served with such penalties, with the latter subsequently unsuccessfully appealing to the Information Tribunal, and thus it was that, last week, SSE Energy Supply were served with one. The SSE notice is interesting reading – the personal data breach in question (defined in amended regulation 2 of PECR as “a breach of security leading to the accidental or unlawful destruction, loss, alteration, unauthorised disclosure of, or access to, personal data transmitted, stored or otherwise processed in connection with the provision of a public electronic communications service”) consisted solely of the sending of one customer email (containing name and account number) to the wrong email address, and it appears that it was reported to the ICO two days after SSE realised (so, effectively, 24 hours too late). If this appears harsh, it is worth noting that the ICO has discretion over whether to impose the penalty or not, and, in determining that she should, the Commissioner took into account a pour encourager les autres argument that

the underlying objective in imposing a monetary penalty is to promote compliance with PECR. The requirement to notify…provides an important opportunity…to assess whether a service provider is complying with its obligations under PECR…A monetary penalty in this case would act as a general encouragement towards compliance…

As any fule kno, the looming General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) expands to all data controllers this obligation to notify the ICO of qualifying personal data breaches. Under GDPR the definition is broadly similar to that in PECR (“a breach of security leading to the accidental or unlawful destruction, loss, alteration, unauthorised disclosure of, or access to, personal data transmitted, stored or otherwise processed”) and a breach qualifies for the notification requirements in all cases unless it is “unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons”. Under GDPR, the window for notification is 72 hours.

But under GDPR, and under the Data Protection Bill currently in Parliament, there is no provision for similar fixed penalty notices for notification failures (although, of course, a failure to notify a breach could constitute a general infringement under article 83, attracting a theoretical non-fixed maximum fine of €10m or 2% of global annual turnover). Is Parliament missing a trick here? If the objective of the PECR fixed penalty notice is to promote compliance with PECR, then why not a similar fixed penalty notice to promote compliance with wider data protection legislation? In 2016/17 the ICO received 1005 notifications by service providers of PECR breaches (up 63% on the previous year) and analysing/investigating these will be no small task. The figure under GDPR will no doubt be much higher, but that is surely not a reason not to provide for a punitive fixed penalty scheme for those who fail to comply with the notification requirements (given what the underlying objective of notification is)?

I would be interested to know if anyone is aware of discussions on this, and whether, as it reaches the Commons, there is any prospect of the Data Protection Bill changing to incorporate fixed penalties for notification failures.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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This old world will never change

Complacency about data protection in the NHS won’t change unless ICO takes firm action

Back in September 2016 I spoke to Vice’s Motherboard, about reports that various NHS bodies were still running Windows XP, and I said

If hospitals are knowingly using insecure XP machines and devices to hold and otherwise process patient data they may well be in serious contravention of their [data protection] obligations

Subsequently, in May this year, the Wannacry exploit indicated that those bodies were indeed vulnerable, with multiple NHS Trusts and GP practices subject to ransomware demands and major system disruption.

That this had enormous impact on patients is evidenced by a new report on the incident from the National Audit Office (NAO), which shows that

6,912 appointments had been cancelled, and [it is] estimated [that] over 19,000 appointments would have been cancelled in total. Neither the Department nor NHS England know how many GP appointments were cancelled, or how many ambulances and patients were diverted from the five accident and emergency departments that were unable to treat some patients

The NAO investigation found that the Department of Health and the Cabinet Office had written to Trusts

saying it was essential they had “robust plans” to migrate away from old software, such as Windows XP, by April 2015. [And in] March and April 2017, NHS Digital had issued critical alerts warning organisations to patch their systems to prevent WannaCry

Although the NAO report is critical of the government departments themselves for failure to do more, it does correctly note that individual healthcare organisations are themselves responsible for the protection of patient information. This is, of course, correct: under the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) each organisation is a data controller, and responsible for, among other things, for ensuring that appropriate technical and organisational measures are taken against unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data.

Yet, despite these failings, and despite the clear evidence of huge disruption for patients and the unavoidable implication that delays in treatment across all NHS services occurred, the report was greeted by the following statement by Keith McNeil, Chief Clinical Information Officer for NHS England

As the NAO report makes clear, no harm was caused to patients and there were no incidents of patient data being compromised or stolen

In fairness to McNeil, he is citing the report itself, which says that “NHS organisations did not report any cases of harm to patients or of data being compromised or stolen” (although that is not quite the same thing). But the report continues

If the WannaCry ransomware attack had led to any patient harm or loss of data then NHS England told us that it would expect trusts to report cases through existing reporting channels, such as reporting data loss direct to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in line with existing policy and guidance on information governance

So it appears that the evidence for no harm arising is because there were no reports of “data loss” to the ICO. This emphasis on “data loss” is frustrating, firstly because personal data does not have to be lost for harm to arise, and it is difficult to understand how delays and emergency diversions would not have led to some harm, but secondly because it is legally mistaken: the DPA makes clear that data security should prevent all sorts of unauthorised processing, and removal/restriction of access is clearly covered by the definition of “processing”.

It is also illustrative of a level of complacency which is deleterious to patient health and safety, and a possible indicator of how the Wannacry incidents happened in the first place. Just because data could not be accessed as a result the malware does not mean that this was not a very serious situation.

It’s not clear whether the ICO will be investigating further, or taking action as a result of the NAO report (their response to my tweeted question – “We will be considering the contents of the report in more detail. We continue to liaise with the health sector on this issue” was particularly unenlightening). I know countless dedicated, highly skilled professionals working in the fields of data protection and information governance in the NHS, they’ve often told me their frustrations with senior staff complacency. Unless the ICO does take action (and this doesn’t necessarily have to be by way of fines) these professionals, but also – more importantly – patients, will continue to be let down, and in the case of the latter, put at the risk of harm.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under 7th principle, Data Protection, data security, enforcement, Information Commissioner, NHS

On some sandy beach

[EDITED 25.07.17 to include references to “sandpits” in the report of the Deepmind Health Independent Review Panel]

What lies behind the Information Commissioner’s recent reference to “sandbox regulation”?

The government minister with responsibility for data protection, Matt Hancock, recently spoke to the Leverhulme Centre. He touched on data protection:

a new Data Protection Bill in this Parliamentary Session…will bring the laws up to date for the modern age, introduce new safeguards for citizens, stronger penalties for infringement, and important new features like the right to be forgotten. It will bring the EU’s GDPR and Law Enforcement Directive into UK law, ensuring we are prepared for Brexit.

All pretty standard stuff (let’s ignore the point that the “right to be forgotten” such as it is, exists under existing law – a big clue to this being that the landmark case was heard by the CJEU in 2014). But Hancock went on to cite with approval some recent words of the Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham:

I think the ICO’s proposal of a data regulatory “sandbox” approach is very impressive and forward looking. It works in financial regulation and I look forward to seeing it in action here.

This refers to Denham’s recent speech on “Promoting privacy with innovation within the law”, in which she said

We are…looking at how we might be able to engage more deeply with companies as they seek to implement privacy by design…How we can contribute to a “safe space” by building a sandbox where companies can test their ideas, services and business models. How we can better recognise the circular rather than linear nature of the design process.

I thought this was interesting – “sandbox regulation” in the financial services sector involves an application to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), for the testing of “innovative” products that don’t necessarily fit into existing regulatory frameworks – the FCA will even where necessary waive rules, and undertake not to take enforcement action.

That this model works for financial services does not, though, necessarily mean it would work when it comes to regulation of laws, such as data protection laws, which give effect to fundamental rights. When I made enquiries to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) for further guidance on what Denham intends, I was told that they “don’t have anything to add to what [she’s] already said about engaging with companies to help implement privacy by design”.

The recent lack of enforcement action by the ICO against the Royal Free NHS Trust regarding its deal with Google Deepmind raised eyebrows in some circles: if the unlawful processing of 1.6 million health records (by their nature sensitive personal data) doesn’t merit formal enforcement, then does anything?

Was that a form of “sandbox regulation”? Presumably not, as it doesn’t appear that the ICO was aware of the arrangement prior to it taking place, but if, as it seems to me, such regulation may involve a light-touch approach where innovation is involved, I really hope that the views and wishes of data subjects are not ignored. If organisations are going to play in the sand with our personal data, we should at the very least know about it.

**EDIT: I have had my attention drawn to references to “sandpits” in the Annual Report of the Deepmind Health Independent Review Panel:

We think it would be helpful if there was a space, similar to the ‘sandpits’ established by the Research Councils, which would allow regulators, the Department of Health and tech providers to discuss these issues at an early stage of product development. The protection of data during testing is an issue that should be discussed in a similar collaborative forum. We believe that there must be a mechanism that allows effective testing without compromising confidential patient information.

It would seem a bit of a coincidence that this report should be published around the same time Denham and Hancock were making their speeches – and I would argue that this only bolsters the case for more transparency from the ICO about how this type of collaborative regulation will take place.

And I notice that the Review Panel say nothing about involving data subjects in “product development”. Until “innovators” understand that data subjects are the key stakeholder in this, I don’t hold out much hope for the proper protection of rights.**

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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An enforcement gap?

ICO wants 200 more staff for GDPR , but its Board think there’s a risk it will instead be losing them

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is, without doubt, a major reconfiguring of European data protection law. And quite rightly, in the lead-up to its becoming fully applicable on 25 May next year, most organisations are considering how best they can comply with its obligations, and, where necessary, effecting changes to achieve that compliance. As altruistic as some organisations are, a major driver for most is the fear that, under GDPR, regulatory sanctions can be severe. Regulators (in the UK this is the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)) will retain powers to force organisations to do, or to stop, something (equivalent to an enforcement notice under our current Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA)), but they will also have the power to levy civil administrative fines of up to €20 million, or 4% of annual global turnover. Much media coverage has, understandably, if misleadingly, focused on these increased “fining” powers (the maximum monetary under the DPA is £500,000). I use the word “misleadingly”, because it is by no means clear that regulators will use the full fining powers available to them: GDPR provides regulators with many other options (see Article 58) and recital 129 in particular states that measures taken should be

appropriate, necessary and proportionate in view of ensuring compliance with this Regulation [emphasis added]

Commentators stressing the existence of these potentially huge administrative fines should be referred to these provisions of GDPR. 

But in the UK, at least, another factor has to be born in mind, and that is the regulator’s capacity to effectively enforce the law. In March this year, the Information Commissioner herself, Elizabeth Denham, told the House of Lords EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee that with the advent of GDPR she was going to need more resource

With the coming of the General Data Protection Regulation we will have more responsibilities, we will have new enforcement powers. So we are putting in new measures to be able to address our new regulatory powers…We have given the government an estimate that we will need a further 200 people in order to be able to do the job.

Those who rather breathlessly reported this with headlines such as “watchdog to hire hundreds more staff” seem to have forgotten the old parental adage of “I want doesn’t always get”. For instance, I want a case of ’47 Cheval Blanc delivered to my door by January Jones, but I’m not planning a domestic change programme around the possibility.

In fact, the statement by Denham might fall into a category best described as “aspirational”, or even “pie in the sky”, when one notes that the ICO Management Board recently received an item on corporate risk, the minutes from which state that

Concern was expressed about the risk of losing staff as GDPR implementation came closer. There remained a risk that the ICO might lose staff in large numbers, but to-date the greater risk was felt to be that the ICO could lose people in particular roles who, because of their experience, were especially hard to replace.

The ICO has long been based in the rather upmarket North West town of Wilmslow (the detailed and parochial walking directions from the railway station to the office have always rather amused me). There is going to be a limited pool of quality candidates there, and ICO pays poorly: current vacancies show case officers being recruited at starting salary of £19,527, and I strongly suspect case officers are the sort of extra staff Denham is looking at.

If ICO is worried about GDPR being a risk to staff retention (no doubt on the basis that better staff will get poached by higher paying employers, keen to have people on board with relevant regulatory experience), and apparently can’t pay a competitive wage, how on earth is it going to retain (or replace) them, and then recruit 200 more, from those sleepy Wilmslow recruitment fairs?

I write this blogpost, I should stress, not in order to mock or criticise Denham’s aspirations – she is absolutely right to want more staff, and to highlight the fact to Westminster. Rather, I write it because I agree with her, and because, unless someone stumps up some significant funding, I fear that the major privacy benefits that GDPR should bring for individuals (and the major sanctions against organisations for serious non-compliance) will not be realised.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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What does it take to stop Lib Dems spamming?

Lib Dems continue to breach ePrivacy law, ICO still won’t take enforcement action.

It’s not difficult: the sending of unsolicited marketing emails to me is unlawful. Regulation 22 of The Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR) and by extension, the first and second principles in Schedule One of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) make it so. The Liberal Democrats have engaged in this unlawful practice – they know and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) know it, because the latter recently told the former that they have, and told me in turn

I have reviewed your correspondence and the [Lib Dem’s] website, and it appears that their current practices would fail to comply with the requirements of the PECR. This is because consent is not knowingly given, clear and specific….As such, we have written to the organisation to remind them of their obligations under the PECR and ensure that valid consent is obtained from individuals

But the ICO has chosen not to take enforcement action, saying to me in an email of 24th April

enforcement action is not taken routinely and it is our decision whether to take it. We cannot take enforcement action in every case that is reported to us

Of course I’d never suggested they take action in every case – I’d requested (as is my right under regulation 32 of PECR) that they take action in this particular case. The ICO also asked for the email addresses I’d used; I gave these over assuming it was for the purposes of pursuing an investigation but no, when I later asked the ICO they said they’d passed them to the Lib Dems in order that they could be suppressed from the Lib Dem mailing list. I could have done that if I wanted to. It wasn’t the point and I actually think the ICO were out of order (and contravening the DPA themselves) in failing to tell me that was the purpose.

But I digress. Failure to comply with PECR and the DPA is rife across the political spectrum and I think it’s strongly arguable that lack of enforcement action by the ICO facilitates this. And to illustrate this, I visited the Lib Dems’ website recently, and saw the following message

Untitled

Vacuous and vague, I suppose, but I don’t disagree, so I entered an email address registered to me (another one I reserve for situations where I fear future spamming) and clicked “I agree”. By return I got an email saying

Friend – Thank you for joining the Liberal Democrats…

Wait – hold on a cotton-picking minute – I haven’t joined the bloody Liberal Democrats – I put an email in a box! Is this how they got their recent, and rather-hard-to-explain-in-the-circumstances “surge” in membership? Am I (admittedly using a pseudonym) now registered with them as a member? If so, that raises serious concerns about DPA compliance – wrongly attributing membership of a political party to someone is processing of sensitive personal data without a legal basis.

It’s possible that I haven’t yet been registered as such, because the email went on to say

Click here to activate your account

When I saw this I actually thought the Lib Dems might have listened to the ICO – I assumed that if I didn’t (I didn’t) “click here” I would hear no more. Not entirely PECR compliant, but a step in the right direction. But no, I’ve since received an email from the lonely Alistair Carmichael asking me to support the Human Rights Act (which I do) but to support it by joining a Lib Dem campaign. This is direct marketing of a political party, I didn’t consent to it, and it’s sending was unlawful.

I’ll report it to the ICO, more in hope than expectation that they will do anything. But if they don’t, I think they have to accept that a continuing failure to take enforcement against casual abuse of privacy laws is going to lead to a proliferation of that abuse.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with..

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Filed under consent, Data Protection, enforcement, Information Commissioner, marketing, PECR, spam

ICO finds Lib Dems in breach of ePrivacy law

A few months ago, when I entered my email address on the Liberal Democrats’ website to say that I agreed with the statement 

Girls should never be cut. We must end FGM

I hoped I wouldn’t subsequently receive spam emails promoting the party. However I had no way of knowing because there was no obvious statement explaining what would happen. But, furthermore, I had clearly not given specific consent to receive such emails.

Nonetheless, I did get them, and continue to do so – emails purportedly from Nick Clegg, from Paddy Ashdown and from others, promoting their party and sometimes soliciting donations.

I happen to think the compiling of a marketing database by use of serious and emotive subjects such as female genital mutilation is extraordinarily tasteless. It’s also manifestly unlawful in terms of Lib Dems’ obligations under the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR), which require specific consent to have been given before marketing emails can be sent to individuals.

On the lawfulness point I am pleased to say the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) agrees with me. Having considered my complaint they have said:

I have reviewed your correspondence and the organisations website, and it appears that their current practices would fail to comply with the requirements of the PECR. This is because consent is not knowingly given, clear and specific….As such, we have written to the organisation to remind them of their obligations under the PECR and ensure that valid consent is obtained from individuals.

Great. I’m glad they agree – casual disregard of PECR seems to be rife throughout politics. As I’ve written recently, the Labour Party, UKIP and Plaid Cymru have also spammed my dedicated email account. But I also asked the ICO to consider taking enforcement action (as is my right under regulation 32 of PECR). Disappointingly, they have declined to do so, saying:

enforcement action is not taken routinely and it is our decision whether to take it. We cannot take enforcement action in every case that is reported to us

It’s also disappointing that they don’t say why this is their decision. I know they cannot take enforcement action in every case reported to them, which is why I requested it in this specific case.

However, I will be interested to see whether the outcome of this case changes the Lib Dems’ approach. Maybe it will, but, as I say, they are by no means the only offenders, and enforcement action by the ICO might just have helped to address this wider problem.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under consent, enforcement, Information Commissioner, marketing, PECR, spam, Uncategorized