Category Archives: Information Commissioner

ICO change to guidance on Subject Access Request time limits

I have a post on the Mishcon de Reya website, on an odd, but potentially very significant, change of position by the Information Commissioner’s Office, when it comes to calculating GDPR time limits for data subject requests.

ICO change to guidance on Subject Access Request time limits

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Open by Design, Closed by Default?

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) have published their new access to information strategy. Something strikes me about their “Goal #2”:

Goal #2: Providing excellent customer service to individuals making requests to us and lead by example in fulfilling our own statutory functions

The thing strikes me is that, bizarrely, they seem to have misunderstood the goal they’ve set themselves (I nearly referred to it as their “own goal”, which has a bit of a ring about it). They say

We have a varied range of individuals who request an independent review from us and a diverse range of public authorities within our jurisdiction from large central government departments to very small parish councils.

What they don’t say is “we are a public authority, subject to the Freedom of Information Act, and have to comply with its timescales, and promote observance of it by example”.

And, unfortunately, there is much evidence recently of a failure to do this.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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ICO still breaching law it’s meant to oversee

A month ago I pointed out some rather concerning  failings by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in its own compliance with Freedom of Information (FOI) law. At the time, the ICO press office told me

We acknowledge that we have fallen short of expectations in these instances but can confirm that the responses to both requests will be issued soon

It’s with some incredulity, therefore, that I see that one of the requests has still not been responded to, despite a further twenty working days having elapsed, and despite the (even greater) incredulity of the requester:

You have missed your own deadline, months after you should have answered this request. Your inability to answer a simple FOI promptly would be a disgrace if you were a local council. The fact that you are the FOI regulator makes your handling of my request a scandal.

I am utterly powerless here – I cannot complain to the regulator about your contempt for FOI because you are supposed to be the organisation I would complain to. Do you have no shame at all? No self respect?

What am I supposed to do now?

The other request I highlighted at the time has had a response, albeit one that was cursory, to say the best, and which is now the subject of a request for internal review.

My own request for the ICO’s compliance figures is now the subject of a formal complaint (with a request for a decision notice under section 50 of the FOI Act), although I am told that there will be, er, a delay in getting to it.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Information Tribunal rejects data subject appeals under new Data Protection Act

The Information Tribunal has recently heard the first applications under the Data Protection Act 2018 for orders regarding the Information Commissioner’s handling of data protection complaints. As I write on the Mishcon de Reya website, the Tribunal has peremptorily dismissed them.

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Filed under Data Protection, enforcement, GDPR, Information Commissioner, Information Tribunal

ICO breaching the law it’s meant to oversee

This may be complete coincidence, but on the WhatDoTheyKnow website, there are two Freedom of Information (FOI) requests, on similar themes, which requesters have made to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), to which – at the time of writing – the ICO appears simply to be failing to respond, way beyond the statutory timescale of 20 working days.

Both requests are about procurement of external consultants. In the first, the requester asked

Please disclose all current agreements for provision of legal services by outside bodies such as barristers chambers, law firms etc. This should include the rates of pay agreed.

The request was made on the 19th February and more than three months on, has simply had no response (other than an automated acknowledgment).

In the second the (different) requester asked

how many times the Information Commissioner’s Office has engaged consultants, companies or other specialists to deliver services to the ICO without putting the work out to tender or otherwise advertising the opportunity externally

That request was made on the 26th February and, barring some holding responses, which seem to have dried up, it has had no substantive response.

The failure to respond is concerning, and the failure to communicate inexplicable. One wonders where the reluctance comes from.

My own recent experience of making FOI requests to them indicates a less-than-ideal level of compliance with the laws the ICO is meant to regulate. However, when, some time ago, I asked the ICO for compliance figures, they refused to disclose them, saying they would be published soon. Yet approximately six months on they still haven’t done so (which is not in compliance with the best-practice requirements of the section 45 FOI Code of Practice).

I offered the ICO an invitation to comment on this blogpost, and in response a spokesperson said: “We aim to resolve 95% of information requests within the statutory deadline, unless we have sought an extension. We acknowledge that we have fallen short of expectations in these instances but can confirm that the responses to both requests will be issued soon.” No comment was made on the wider point about compliance, and publication of compliance statistics. (I would also make the observation that it’s rather surprising ICO only aims to respond to 95% of requests within the statutory deadline – surely they would (and should) aim to respond to 100% within the timeframe mandated by the law?)

I’ve previously expressed concern about the ICO’s unwillingness to take enforcement action against recalcitrant, if not contemptuous, public authorities for poor FOI compliance. Elizabeth Denham has recently (and unsuccessfully) called for an extension of FOI law, saying

Part of my job is to make sure that the legislation my office regulates fulfils its objectives and remains relevant. When it does not, I will speak out

Will she also speak out about the fact that her office is not itself complying with the legislation it regulates?

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog, unless they indicate otherwise) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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ICO – HMRC must delete 5 million voice records

I have a piece on the Mishcon de Reya website, on news that the ICO has required HMRC to delete 5 million unlawfully gathered Voice ID records.

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Filed under consent, Data Protection, HMRC, Information Commissioner

Farrow & Ball lose appeal for non-payment of data protection fee

I have a new post on the Mishcon de Reya website, drawing attention to the first (and unsuccessful) attempt to appeal an ICO monetary penalty for failing to pay the statutory data protection fee.

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ICO hasn’t given own staff a GDPR privacy notice

The first principle of GDPR says that personal data shall be processed in a transparent manner. Articles 13 and 14 give details of what information should be provided to data subjects to comply with that principle (and that information should be provided at the time it is collected (if it is collected directly from the data subject)).

As the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) says

Individuals have the right to be informed about the collection and use of their personal data. This is a key transparency requirement under the GDPR. [emphasis added]

and

Getting the right to be informed correct can help you to comply with other aspects of the GDPR and build trust with people, but getting it wrong can leave you open to fines and lead to reputational damage

If you read the ICO’s Guide to GDPR, it is largely predicated on the understanding that privacy notices will be made available to data subjects, effectively as a prerequisite to overall compliance.

So, one thing a data controller must – surely – prioritise (and have prioritised, in advance of GDPR becoming applicable in May 2018) is the preparation and giving of appropriate privacy notices, including to its own employees.

With that in mind, I was interested surprised astounded well-and-truly-gobsmacked to see an admission, on the “WhatDoTheyKnow” website, that the ICO itself has – almost a year on from GDPR’s start – not yet prepared, let alone given, its own staff a GDPR privacy notice

I can confirm we do not currently hold the information you have requested. The privacy notice for ICO employees is currently under construction.

As getting the right to be informed wrong can leave one open to fines (as well as reputational damage), one wonders if ICO is considering fining itself for this fundamental infringement of a fundamental right?

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog, unless they indicate otherwise) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under Data Protection, fairness, GDPR, Information Commissioner, privacy notice, transparency

ICO – no GDPR fines in the immediate pipeline

FOI request reveals ICO has served no “notices of intent” to serve fines under GDPR. A new piece by me on the Mishcon de Reya website.

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Filed under Data Protection, Freedom of Information, GDPR, Information Commissioner, monetary penalty notice

There’s nothing like transparency…

…and this is nothing like transparency

Those of us with long memories will remember that, back in 2007, in those innocent days when no one quite knew what the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) really meant, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), disclosed some of its internal advice (“Lines to Take” or “LTTs”) to its own staff about how to respond to questions and enquiries from members of the public about FOIA. My memory (I hope others might confirm) is that ICO resisted this disclosure for some time. Now, the advice documents reside on the “FOIWiki” pages (where they need, in my opinion, a disclaimer to the effect that some of the them at least are old, and perhaps out-of-date).

Since 2007 a number of further FOIA requests have been made for more recent LTTs – for instance, in 2013, I made a request, and had disclosed to me, a number of LTTs on data protection matters.

It is, therefore, with some astonishment, that I note that a recent FOIA request to ICO for up-to-date LTTs – encompassing recent changes to data protection law – has been refused, on the basis that, apparently, disclosure would, or would be likely to, inhibit the free and frank exchange of views for the purposes of  deliberation, and would otherwise prejudice, or would be likely otherwise to prejudice, the effective conduct of public affairs. This is problematic, and concerning, for a number of reasons.

Firstly, the exemptions claimed, which are at section 36 of FOIA, are the statute’s howitzers – they get brought into play when all else fails, and have the effect of flattening everything around them. For this reason, the public authority invoking them must have the “reasonable opinion” of its “qualified person” that disclosure would, or would be likely to, cause the harm claimed. For the ICO, the “qualified person” is the Information Commissioner (Elizabeth Denham) herself. Yet there is no evidence that she has indeed provided this opinion. For that reason, the refusal notice falls – as a matter of law – at the first hurdle.

Secondly, even if Ms Denham had provided her reasonable opinion, the response fails to say why the exemptions are engaged – it merely asserts that they are, in breach of section 17(1)(c) of FOIA.

Thirdly, it posits frankly bizarre public interest points purportedly militating against disclosure, such as that the LTTs “exist as part of the process by which we create guidance, not as guidance by themselves”, and “that ICO  staff should have a safe space to provide colleagues with advice for them to respond to challenges posed to us in a changing data protection landscape”, and – most bizarre of all – “following a disclosure of  such notes in the past, attempts have been made to utilise similar documents to undermine our regulatory procedures” (heaven forfend someone might cite a regulator’s own documents to advance their case).

There has been such an enormous amount of nonsense spoken about the new data protection regime, and I have praised ICO for confronting some of the myths which have been propagated by the ignorant or the venal. There continues to be great uncertainty and ignorance, and disclosing these LTTs could go a long way towards combatting these. In ICO’s defence, it does identify this as a public interest factor militating in favour of disclosure:

disclosure may help improve knowledge regarding the EIR, FOIA or  the new data protection legislation on which the public desire information as evidenced by our increase in calls and enquiry handling

And as far as I’m concerned, that should be the end of the matter. Whether the requester (a certain “Alan Shearer”) chooses to challenge the refusal is another question.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under Data Protection, Freedom of Information, GDPR, Information Commissioner, transparency