Category Archives: DCMS

MPs, Lords, councillors exempt from data protection fee

As I have previously discussed on the Mishcon de Reya website, the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) removed the requirement at European law for data controllers to “register” with their supervisory authority. However, in the UK, the need to provide a funding stream for the data protection work of the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) led parliament to pass laws (The Data Protection (Charges and Information) Regulations 2018) (“the Fee Regulations”), made under sections 137 and 138 of the Data Protection Act 2018 (“DPA”)) requiring controllers to pay a fee to the ICO, unless an exemption applied.

New amendment regulations (The Data Protection (Charges and Information) (Amendment) Regulations 2019) have now been passed, following a consultation run by DCMS last year. These mean that new categories of exempt processing are introduced. In short, processing of personal data by members of the House of Lords, elected representatives and prospective representatives is also now “exempt processing” for the purposes of the Fee Regulations. “Elected representative” means (adopting the definition at paragraph 23(3)(a) to (d) and (f) to (m) of Schedule 1 to the DPA)

a member of the House of Commons;
a member of the National Assembly for Wales;
a member of the Scottish Parliament;
a member of the Northern Ireland Assembly;
an elected member of a local authority within the meaning of section 270(1) of the Local Government Act 1972
an elected mayor of a local authority within the meaning of Part 1A or 2 of the Local Government Act 2000;
a mayor for the area of a combined authority established under section 103 of the Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Act 2009;
the Mayor of London or an elected member of the London Assembly;
an elected member of the Common Council of the City of London, or the Council of the Isles of Scilly;
an elected member of a council constituted under section 2 of the Local Government etc (Scotland) Act 1994;
an elected member of a district council within the meaning of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972;
a police and crime commissioner.

But, it should be noted, MEPs’ processing is not exempt, and, for the time being at least, they must still pay a fee.

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Serious DCMS error about consent and data protection 

I blogged on Monday about the government Statement of Intent regarding the forthcoming Data Protection Bill. What I missed at the time was an accompanying release on the Department for Digital, Culture,  Media and Sport (DCMS) website.  Having now seen it, I realise why so many media outlets have been making a profoundly misleading statement about consent under the new data protection law: they have lifted it directly from DCMS. The statement is

The Data Protection Bill will require ‘explicit’ consent to be necessary for processing sensitive personal data

It should only take a second to realise how wrong this is: sensitive personal data will include information about, among other things, health, and criminal convictions. Is the government proposing, say, that, before passing on information about a critically injured patient to an A&E department, a paramedic will have to get the unconscious patient’s explicit consent? Is it proposing that before passing on information about a convicted sex offender to a local authority social care department the Disclosure and Barring Service will have to get the offender’s explicit consent? 

Of course not – it’s absolute nonsense to think so, and the parliamentary drafters of the forthcoming Bill would not dream of writing the law in such a way, not least because it would contravene our obligations under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) around which much of the Bill will be based. GDPR effectively mirrors the existing European Data Protection Directive (given effect in our existing Data Protection Act 1998). Under these laws, there are multiple circumstances under which personal data, and higher-category sensitive personal data can be processed. Consent is one of those. But there are, in Article 9(2) of GDPR, nine other conditions which permit the processing of special category data (the GDPR term used to replicate what is called “sensitive personal data” under existing domestic data protection law), and GDPR affords member states the power to legislate for further conditions.

What the DCMS release should say is that when consent is legitimately relied upon to process sensitive personal data the consent must be explicit. I know that sentence has got more words on it than the DCMS original, but that’s because sometimes a statement needs more words in order to be correct, and make sense, rather than mislead on a very important point regarding people’s fundamental rights.

I tweeted Matt Hancock, the minister, about the error, but with no answer as yet. I’ve also invited DCMS to correct it. The horse has already bolted though, as a Google news search for the offending phrase will show. The Information Commissioner’s Office has begun a series of pieces addressing GDPR myths, and I hope this is one they’ll talk about, but DCMS themselves should still issue a corrective, and soon.

The views in this post (and indeed all posts on this blog) are my personal ones, and do not represent the views of any organisation I am involved with.

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Filed under consent, Data Protection, DCMS, GDPR, Information Commissioner, Uncategorized